Strange radio waves that could solve ancient mystery revealed in never-before-seen Milky Way images

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A NEW set of Milky Way photos have been released, showing one of the most revealing looks at the galaxy yet and answering some unresolved questions.

This achievement was possible thanks to the union of two astronomy research programs.

The photos were acquired by the union of two research programs

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The photos were acquired by the union of two research programsCredit: The combined ASKAP/EMU plus Parkes/PEGASUS image. R. Kothes/NRC/E. Carretti/INAF
The programs united the data from two different telescopes and delivered the clearest view of the galaxy yet

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The programs united the data from two different telescopes and delivered the clearest view of the galaxy yetCredit: The ASKAP/EMU imageR. Kothes/NRC/E. Carretti/INAF

The programs are called EMU and PEGASUS and they band together to determine the location of the remaining supernova remnants.

These remnants mark the end of the life of a star and are an expanding cloud of gas and dust.

Before the programs united forces, the supernova remnants that were spotted by researchers were too few.

ScienceAlert reports that researchers united the findings of two of Australia’s telescopes, finding over 20 possible supernova remnants.

These were found in a small patch of the galaxy that makes up about 1 percent of the Milky Way, suggesting the existence of many more.

Before these images, only seven supernova remnants had been spotted and their existence and location had remained a mystery.

Researchers explained that this information was acquired after data from the two telescopes – ASKAP and Parkes/Murriyang – was pooled together.

What one telescope lacked, the other made up for, resulting in the most accurate pictures of the galaxy yet.

In the future, researchers predict that the collaboration between the two programs will provide an “unprecedented view of almost the entire Milky Way, about a hundred times larger than this initial image, but with the same level of detail and sensitivity.”

As of now, researchers estimate there are about 1,500 supernova remnants that have yet to be spotted.

Researchers promise that this collaboration will result in a view of almost the entire Milky Way

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Researchers promise that this collaboration will result in a view of almost the entire Milky WayCredit: The combined ASKAP/EMU plus Parkes/PEGASUS image. R. Kothes/NRC/E. Carretti/INAF



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